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How Do I Make a Homemade Enema?

A reusable enema bag.
Epsom salt, which can be used in a homemade enema.
A person should be near a toilet when administering an enema.
Molasses can be mixed with milk to make an enema.
Apple cider vinegar can help clean the intestines.
Article Details
  • Originally Written By: Christine Hudson
  • Revised By: Jennifer Long
  • Edited By: Lauren Fritsky
  • Last Modified Date: 11 September 2014
  • Copyright Protected:
    2003-2014
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Making homemade enemas is fairly straightforward as long as you have some basic equipment. You should also consider which type of solution you want to use, as many different types can be made at home. Administration of homemade enemas is similar to those bought in stores, but you do have to take a few extra precautions. For this reason, some prefer to use storebought kits and solutions.

Equipment

To make a homemade enema, you'll need a clear plastic bag or bottle, medical tubing, and something to use as a nozzle or support for the other end of the tube. You'll also need clamps to connect the tubing to the bag or bottle and the nozzle. To assemble the equipment, connect the tubing to the bag, and secure it with a clamp. Do the same with the nozzle on the other end. If you don't have a nozzle, you can insert an unused plastic drinking straw into the tubing so that it won't collapse when inserted into the rectum. Alternatively, you can buy a kit in a store and just make homemade solutions.

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Solutions

There are a variety of enema solutions, many of which can be made at home. The most basic type is a warm water enema, which consists of purified water. This can help stimulate the movement of the intestines and soften hard stools. Other common types of solutions include mineral oil, molasses and milk, olive oil, and castile soap, all of which can be helpful for constipation. Lemon juice, apple cider vinegar, and coffee enemas can be used for cleaning the intestines.

Administration

To administer your enema, first assemble all of your equipment and make sure that it is clean and sterile. Put a clamp on the tube connected to the bag or bottle before filling it with the enema solution. Clamping before filling is important to keep the fluid from flowing through immediately. Unless you're using a squeeze bottle, you should hang the bag a few feet above where you'll be taking the enema — usually no more than 3 feet (1 m). The higher you hang the bag, the more pressure you'll experience when the solution flows into your rectum.

You should go to a comfortable place close to a toilet, and put down some towels or a rug in case of leakage. Some people prefer to lay on the floor of their bathroom, while others prefer to cover a bed in towels and lay there. There are several positions that you can take the enema in, but the most common ones are laying on the side with your top knee flexed towards your chest or on your back with your knees pulled towards your chest.

When you are ready to take the enema, you or a partner should lubricate the end of the tube and the inside and outside of your rectum. Next, gently insert the nozzle or tube into the rectum until it's about 3 in (7.50 cm) inside. When you're ready, loosen the clamp on the tube to let the water flow into your rectum. You can adjust the pressure and speed of the water by raising or lowering the bag and by tightening or loosening the clamp. Once you have inserted all of the solution or you feel full, let the solution work for up to 10 minutes, go to a toilet, remove the nozzle, and evacuate your bowels.

Precautions

It's essential to make sure that all of your equipment is clean, so if you plan on using the same equipment over and over again, you should sterilize it after each usage, and not put it away until it is fully dry. You should always check your equipment for leaks before using it, which you can do by letting a little bit of solution flow out of the bag into a toilet or sink. Additionally, you should make sure that all of the ingredients in your mixture are sterile or pure, including any water. As with any enema, you should make sure that the solution is the proper temperature, around 100 and 105° F (about 38 to 41° C), as too cold water can cause cramping and too hot water can burn. It's important to check with your healthcare practitioner before taking any enema, as using them improperly can cause dehydration or dependence, and certain types of solutions can exacerbate certain health problems in people with heart failure or renal problems.

Homemade vs. Storebought

Some people prefer storebought kits because they come pre-assembled or are easy to assemble, and are often pre-sterilized. Repeatedly buying disposable kits can be expensive, however, so those who use enemas often may prefer to make their own kits. In terms of solutions, some prefer the storebought versions because they are sterile and pre-made, but others prefer to make homemade enema solutions since they can be sure of all of the ingredients in the solution, and they can control the proportion of ingredients.

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Discuss this Article

anon324425
Post 8

I lost my anal virginity at age of 8 to my step-sister, who was, 14 under her mother's supervision. It was frightening and mortifying, but in my youth as common as going to the bathroom. It was a female only prerogative/duty to perform and medically recommended. Reportedly, Marylin Monroe enjoyed frequent enemas kindly provided by a live-in maid (lucky).

JessicaLynn
Post 7

@Pharoah - I'm with you. I don't think I would want to make myself a homemade enema to use. However, some people are really, really handy, so if you have the skills to make your own stuff, why not?

That being said, I hope anyone who is planning to do this follow the advice in the article to sterilize your equipment!

Pharoah
Post 6

I am a pretty staunch fan of homemade stuff, but I draw the line at a homemade enema! You can buy reusable enema bags at the store for fairly cheap, and then just make your own solution. I feel like that would be a happy medium between buying a disposable enema each time and making a homemade enema bag!

I don't know why, but the whole idea just kind of sketches me out. I can't even think of what you could use for a bag and tubing in this situation!

dean
Post 4

I don't think I'd want to use an enema which caused bad cramps. That's usually your body's way of saying something is wrong.

After researching the milk enema, it sounds pretty effective, but you would definitely want to follow up with an internal cleansing.

StormyKnight
Post 3

There is also a lemon juice enema that it very effective for cleansing of the colon. You use ½ cup lemon juice per quart of water. The only problem with this one is that it is said that the cramps may be pretty bad.

dill1971
Post 2

@calabama71: My mother has actually used the milk enema. I’m not sure of the success of it, but she mixes 1 ½ quarts of warm water with 16 oz. warm milk and 1 Tbsp. olive oil. You can heat the milk in the microwave and then pour all of the ingredients in the enema bag. You can also add a Tbsp. of honey.

calabama71
Post 1

I know that this sounds odd, but my cousin's son was recently in the hospital with stomach problems. She said that they gave him an enema made of milk. I had never heard of such but she said it worked better than anything that she had ever seen.

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