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How Do I Treat a Cigarette Burn?

Cigarette burns may result in circular scars.
Cigarette burns should be bandaged by a medical professional to prevent infection.
The three degrees of burns.
An ice pack, which can help with pain from a cigarette burn.
Turmeric powder can help treat a cigarette burn.
Man smoking a cigarette.
Aloe vera gel is commonly used to treat burns.
Cilantro can help heal a cigarette burn.
Cigarettes in an ashtray.
Article Details
  • Written By: Kasey James
  • Edited By: Lauren Fritsky
  • Last Modified Date: 18 August 2014
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A cigarette burn on the skin can be treated using some kind of cold application, natural herbs, or medications. Some burns may need a combination of treatment depending on the size of the burn. This type of injury can be very painful, and it can leave a scar in some cases. Treatment should be started immediately after the burn takes place.

The skin that has the burn should be placed under cold running water or have ice put on it right away. The cold sensation will help to reduce the pain quickly, and the ice should stay on the burned skin for at least 15 minutes. If the pain continues, replacing the ice pack and keeping it on the burnt skin a little longer may help.

After the pain is less severe, the burned area should be washed with water and antibacterial soap. Cleaning the area is important and will reduce the chance of infection. Warm water is best when washing skin, but it may be too painful. If this is the case, then cool water can be used with the soap.

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Some natural herbs may help to heal and comfort a cigarette burn to the skin. Aloe is a natural plant that can help to soothe and heal a burn. You can cut an aloe leaf or get aloe vera gel. Other natural herbs that help a burn could be sandalwood powder, turmeric powder, or cilantro. Natural herbs are usually inexpensive, and you do not need a prescription to purchase them.

There are some medications that can help heal any kind of burn. Burn ointments can be bought over the counter or prescribed by a medical professional. After any treatment, the burn should be bandaged to try to prevent infection.

With any cigarette burn, there is a chance of infection. If you take off the burn bandage and you see white or green fluid on the area, then it is possible there is an infection. Other signs could include swelling, change in color, or worsened pain. If you think there is infection, you should see a medical professional right away.

Often, a cigarette burn will leave a circular scar. Treating the burn when it first happens will reduce the chances of this happening. If there is a scar left from the burn, be sure to put a moisturizing lotion on it daily. The scar will take time to fade.

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Discuss this Article

nefret
Post 11

Just wanted to mention treatment of the blisters after a cigarette burn since there's always some debate about whether or not to puncture it and drain the liquid. I think it's safest to just keep the area clean and dry. Is the general consensus that liquid blisters can be drained but that blood blisters should be left alone?

jsmay
Post 10

@mabeT - I definitely agree that putting butter or margarine on a burn is a bit of an old wives tale. There is another great treatment for burns which builds on the idea of aloe gel. You simply put aloe gel into an ice cube tray, freeze it, and then use the frozen gel cubes on the burn area. It helps to heal and minimizes that awful burning sensation too. Are there any other home remedies that work for cigarette burns?

mabeT
Post 9

@Janismiller – You’re right about the toothpaste. It really is very helpful with the stinging from any kind of minor burn.

I will have to say, though, that I have heard of a lot of folks who put things like butter or margarine on it to ease the pain.

It is very important not to do this! The fat actually can cause the burn to continue destroying tissues longer and make matters worse. Plus it can leave an even uglier scar.

Domido
Post 8

Here is the story of how my husband and I almost divorced. He was a smoker and I was not, but it was okay with me at the time. I just figured that it was his thing, and it wasn’t the end of the world.

Well, it almost was the end of his world when I bought a new car. It was my first new car ever, and it was wonderful and beautiful and amazing!

Then he decides he’s going to light up…in my new car. Then he drops the thing…in my new car. Then it burns my leg…in my new car.

Cigarette burns in a car seat cannot easily be repaired, and my leg surely couldn't. I was furious.

I was ready to truly do some real kind of Rambo moves that day, but one thing was for sure. He knew not to light up in my new car again or he would be getting his papers.

tlcJPC
Post 7

I grew up during a time when most parents smoked, and their parents smoked and, well heck, their parents smoked, too. Everyone just smoked and it wasn’t a big deal like it is now.

I can honestly say I never really noticed cigarette smoke smells until I was at least eighteen because I had smelled it all of my life!

Regardless, with all that smoking going on it was inevitable that someone would eventually get burned. Guess who it was! That’s right, you’re looking at her. (Well, reading her words, anyhow.)

I stepped on a tossed butt, and I can tell you something honest and true: that mess hurts! It might be small, but it really is very painful.

First thing I learned: don’t play barefoot in a yard full of smokers. Second thing that I learned: aloe vera is the most awesome plant ever created.

Just a little dab off of a broken stem of that plant really did ease the pain, although it had to keep being reapplied. It probably didn’t help that it was on the bottom of my foot either.

cafe41
Post 6

@Cupcake15 - I am sorry to hear that. I wanted to say that at least you weren’t there when it happened.

I had a friend that had a cigarette burn scar from just walking around in a bar and she used petroleum jelly to ease the pain. I don’t know if she had an infected cigarette burn or not, but it seemed to have helped her feel better. I know that petroleum jelly also helps on chaffing skin as well.

cupcake15
Post 5

@Manykitties2 - I have to say that I have never experienced a cigarette burn scar because I try to stay as far away from smokers as I can. I really cannot stand the smell of smoke and really find it offensive.

The only experience that I have had with a cigarette burn was as a result of some ashes from the apartment above me falling on my furniture. I was so upset because the people above me smoke on their balcony and the ashes fell on my furniture. It actually burned a hole in one of my cushions. I was so upset.

There is really no way to repair a cigarette burn like that. I simply had to turn the cushion over and hope it doesn’t happen again.

frosted
Post 4

Tea tree oil is my favorite method of treating a burn. I have used it on burns from curling irons and oven racks. If applied generously and often I have not even had a blister. Be aware it does have a strange odor that takes getting used to.

A word of caution, if you do get a cigarette burn blister, do not pop it. That increases the chance of infection.

Janismiller
Post 3

Cilantro! I have never heard of using cilantro as a burn treatment, although I love to eat it! That is something I will definitely check out.

I know this sounds crazy, but I have used toothpaste to treat a burn. Don’t use the gel kind though. I cannot remember who told me about it, but it has worked for me.

manykitties2
Post 2

If you are burned with a cigarette make sure that the whole area is washed carefully and quickly. I once managed to duck away from a cigarette but got many tiny cinders on me, which hurt just as badly.

The whole area was sore for a few days and it swelled quite a bit. I ended up having to get antibiotics from my doctor and get some special cream to apply on the burns.

If you are sure you don't have an infection, get the antibiotic cream anyways. It is available over the counter and it is a good precaution.

lonelygod
Post 1

I have always hated walking through crowded bars that allow smoking. Not only do they smell terrible but also I find many people careless with their cigarettes.

During my time visiting bars I have had my jacket burned twice and my hands three times. I find that when people are talking with their hands they are less aware of what is around them and often end up swinging their cigarette into people.

I think that if you are going to smoke in a bar you should make a point to do so carefully. There is nothing that makes people angrier than getting hurt by some stranger’s habit.

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