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What are Irish Twins?

This brother and sister were born less than 12 months apart.
These siblings were born less than 12 months apart.
Irish twins.
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The term “Irish twins” is used to describe two children born to the same mother within 12 months of each other or born in the same calendar year. Given that it is a somewhat derogatory term, it is generally not used in print or in polite society. As is the case with many terms with derogatory origins, some people use it without thinking about the implications of the deeper meaning. Learning about the roots of these terms and the meaning behind them can help people to decide whether or not they are appropriate for common use.

The roots of the idea behind the term are actually quite old, although no one knows when, exactly, people first began to talk about Irish twins. In both England and the United States, a massive influx of Irish immigration in the 1800s led to a negative connotation with Irish people and society. This often happens when a large immigrant group begins to settle in mass numbers in a new country. The Irish were accused of being backward and uncultured, and it was assumed that they were uneducated, dirty, and a general pox on society. As a result, the use of the word “Irish” began to be pejorative.

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A number of derogatory terms incorporating stereotypes about the Irish began to emerge, including “Irish confetti” for thrown bricks and “Irish kiss” for a slap. Irish twins fits into this vernacular, and is actually insulting on multiple levels.

Firstly, the term pokes fun at the stereotypical fertility of Irish Catholic families, which traditionally do not use birth control. In addition, it implies that the Irish lack the ability to plan ahead or control themselves, having children in quick succession rather than responsibly spacing them. Finally, it suggests that the Irish do not understand the medical definition of twins, which involves two children conceived and born together.

A variation on the term is “Irish triplets,” which means three children born within three years. Parents who have Irish twins or triplets often struggle with a variety of issues, since having two or three very young children to manage can be very stressful. As the children grow up, the parents may encounter other difficulties as well, such as the simultaneous payment of astronomical college tuition fees. However, Irish twins often end up being very close and affectionate with each other, since the space between them is so small, and it intensifies the sibling bond.

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anon961382
Post 188

I think my husband's family has you all beat. He is the oldest of 12 children, all born to the same parents. He was born in 1983, and the last was born in 2000 (all single births). Obviously, they weren't all born with 12 months of each other, but 12 children in 17 years is crazy! My sister and I were true to the definition as well, being 10.5 months apart.

anon927669
Post 186

My sister and I are 11 months and 19 days apart. I was born in August 1999 and she was born in August 2000. When i tell people about us, they are very shocked.

anon358179
Post 185

Every time I tell people that my older brother and I were born in the same year, they say that we are Irish twins. I was curious what it meant and so I looked it up on here. He was born January 29 and I was born December 17 of the same year. We have some Irish in us. Also his entire name is Irish but mine is just the first and last name.

anon354496
Post 184

"Irish twin" here too. Me and my sister were born on the same day exactly a year apart. I've been told that we had show some similar traits of actual twins, like the whole twin language that some twin infants create.

anon354154
Post 183

I'm 100 percent Irish. All my grandparents and all eight great-grandparents were born in Ireland, along with my first three aunts on one side before my mom's parents came to Canada in the 1960s. My gran had "Irish Twins" twice over her nine-kid career, and actual twins once. She always called them that, and so have many other members of our extended family who've had babies less than 12 months (365 days) apart, including myself. I've had Irish Twins twice, just like my gran, and with real twins in between, just like gran, except mine are fraternal and hers were identical. Seems we're a fertile bunch and it's quite common among the ranks.

I think we can agree my Irish qualifications are in order when I say I don't find the term "Irish Twins" the least bit offensive.

Things change meanings over time. What was offensive 100 years ago no longer holds any meaning or context, and on the other side of the coin, what was perfectly acceptable 100 years ago often horrifies us today.

Lighten up and embrace your "Irish Twins" whether you're Irish, Polack, Nigerian or a good ol' mutt!

anon351305
Post 182

Me and my brother are Irish twins. I got married in 2000, him in early 2001. I swear his wedding boosted my fertility because that night, before my husband was to leave for three weeks to visit his sick mother in San Diego, I got pregnant with twins! My daughters were born in September 2001, just six weeks early.

I found out I was pregnant again on Christmas eve and cried, cried, cried. My twin sons were born early as well, in June 2002. I had to put four kids on the school bus headed to their kindergarten class five years later, and they've been in the same grade ever since. I'm extremely blessed with my two sets of twins, but what's even crazier is he and his wife just had their own set of Irish twins in 2010-2011. They were born 13 months apart, but they all went to term so that's definitely a blessing!

anon350789
Post 181

My sister and I are11 months and two weeks apart. She was born in mid-November 1999 and I was born in November 2000. We are so much alike, I swear we should be twins.

anon343612
Post 180

My brother and I are 11 months apart to the day, August 23 to July 23. Also us plus our sister, so we're Irish triplets.

anon343162
Post 179

My sister an I are true, full term Irish Twins. She was born July 67 and I was born May 68, 10 months to the day.

anon341712
Post 178

My sister and I are one year apart to the day -- April 10. Our grandma was also born on April 10.

anon341245
Post 177

I may have you all beat. My parents had five children from 1961 to 1965. I was second in 1962 and my Irish twin brother was born 10 months, two weeks later. We were too close in age, competitive and combative. My best relationship is with my last two brothers, born in 1967 and 1970 whom I helped raise.

dabnis
Post 175

Top this: I was born October 1. My sister was born October 2 of the following year. Another sister was born October 2 the next year and finally, the next year, My brother was born September 30. Same Mom and Dad.

anon290618
Post 173

I gave birth to four children within three years and four months

Birth order dates: May 7; May 6; June 23; September 7;

three years, four months. I guess that makes them Irish quadruplets! I'm of Irish descent, and I don't find it derogatory in the least. We are one big happy family!

anon283507
Post 172

Perhaps those saying its not derogative are actually not Irish? I'm Irish born and raised and when I first heard the term I thought, "yup that sounds offensive."

Just think would you, in polite company say, "Indian Twins"! Probably not. Something within you would say, "Hmm. That does not sound like something nice to say." Same applies for "Irish twins."

When Irish people allow people to use this term in polite company, they are actually saying "it's okay". It's not ok.

anon275604
Post 171

Me and my younger sister are Irish twins and we are inseparable. We love spending time with each other and are very affectionate towards one another.

anon274211
Post 170

My brother and his wife have Irish Quadruplets (all girls) and are expecting another baby in just a few months and she'll make them Irish Quintuplets. My sister-in-law always wanted to have lots of kids, since she was an only child. They love having their kids close together in age, because they entertain each other and can pass down clothes as the older ones grow out of them. That makes it a lot less expensive than many might assume when you have four young kids.

My brother (the one with the four daughters) and I were born 18 months apart and we were always closer to each other than we were to our oldest and youngest brothers.

anon269662
Post 169

I was born Dec 1956 and my younger brother, Nov 1957. In high school we were in the same Algebra and Chemistry classes together. He is very intelligent, and has been a doctor since he was 26 years old. I guess he got his smarts from his older sister!

It's neat that we are the same age three weeks out of each year, over the Thanksgiving holiday. I did not know of the term until a few years ago, but we are part Irish and of course, of Catholic upbringing!

We have two younger siblings, each 15 months younger than the other, so Mom was very busy! The rest of our siblings are close in age. When I was young I was told we were "stair step siblings". We're all close and maintain a great sense of humor and certainly joke around a lot!

anon259849
Post 168

I was pregnant with twins, and lost one at 20 weeks and the other was born at term. Then I had "Irish twins" five and six years later, with one being due January, 2001, but born December, 2000; and the other being due November, 2001, and being born in October, 2001.

anon258775
Post 167

I have Irish twins. My oldest was born March 2006 and my youngest was born December 2006.

anon253546
Post 166

My older brother (Feb. 1958), me (Dec. 1958), younger brother (Oct. 1959), and a sister (Oct. 1960) are Irish quads with two more girls in Dec. 1961 and Sept. 1964. Close? Not hardly!

anon251174
Post 165

Me and my sister are Irish twins. We were born on the same day, exactly one year apart. We have an older sister too, but between the three of us, me and my "Irish twin" are the closest!

anon251075
Post 164

The Irish have a better sense of humor than most. So I don't see it as a problem.

Perhaps all those sunburns give the Irish thicker skin?

anon245359
Post 163

I too just heard the term Irish twins, but I bet my family beats them all: Irish quadruplets! The eldest brother was born in May 1957, the middle brother in March 1958, the youngest brother in December 1959 and me, the only girl, in November 1960!

My youngest brother and I are the best yet, since we were in the same grade even though he was 11 months older. He was born on Dec. 14th. My mom said she didn't know she could still get pregnant while breastfeeding and still remembers a very amorous night on February 14th (Valentine's Day) and here's the clincher: I was born exactly on November 14th! Yes, Latin Roman Catholic.

anon231058
Post 162

The term 'Irish Twin' in my experience is an endearing term. Those who have identified themselves to me as an Irish twin do so in a very lighthearted vein and perceive themselves as special and unique.

anon202200
Post 161

My Mother was the oldest of five. The first three born in three years. I didn't know they where "Irish triplets.' But my grandma did suggest not to have three in three years; it's a lot of work. The other two were spaced a bit from the first three and a couple of years from each other.

anon191958
Post 160

I've known of this term for quite some time now and have never regarded it as the slightest bit offensive -- just amusing!

The closest I've got is five aunts and uncles all born within 13 months of each other from 1969 to 1973. As well, although it doesn't count, I've got three cousins all born within four months of each other in 1998, and my sister and another cousin born with eight months of each other the following year. My grandparents went from five grandchildren to 10 in a span of just under 14 months!

anon183445
Post 159

Clearly from the posts on this article the term "Irish twin" is no longer derogatory or pejorative as its author states.

My family is Irish. My brothers are 14 months apart and we often tell people that they are almost Irish twins. We meet many people who happily refer to themselves as Irish twins. Really, Irish people in general have such a sense of humor about the whole thing and by using the term in a joking way really has taken the sting out of it.

anon179902
Post 158

My sister and I were born five years apart to the day. I wish they had a twin name for us, because that would be cool. It's so odd how we share the same birthday but we are totally different in personality and features. Although I feel closet to her, she is my only sister. I have two brothers one the eldest, one the youngest. It's pretty sweet sharing a birthday.

anon179168
Post 157

It was so neat reading all these posts. I just heard the term "Irish twins" this morning-as well as "Irish triplets" and found it quite fascinating.

My younger brother and I are not Irish twins but were born in July '69, then Nov.'70 and have always been very close-even to this day we always know when something is just not right with the other and we have to call to find out what is happening with the other. Our relationship is just as close as some that I have witnessed with twins.

We also have an older brother who was born in May of '68. If I am understanding all of this correctly then we would be considered Irish triplets. I do not consider any of this to be derogatory in the least.

Siblings close in age seem to be closer than other siblings and I like that. It makes for hilarious family get togethers and a lot of fun any day of the year. All I can say is I love it-being so close in age, and bless my mother because she nurtured the closeness we all have with each other.

anon176163
Post 155

Siblings who are born in "quick succession" have more to share, so they build a stronger bond and tend to stay closer to each other all through their lives. It is actually quite responsible to have children in succession while you're still young. As for "astronomical college tuition fees," it might shock Americans, but in lots of countries education is free.

anon174165
Post 154

My name is Victoria. I am currently an Irish triplet, plus Irish twin. My sister Sarah was born February 1980. My sister Anna was born February 1982 and I was born December 1982. My sisters and I are very close. I currently am a proud mum of five wonderful children. After only just recently finding out about Irish twins and triplets to discover that not only am I an Irish twin and triplet, my three youngest are Irish triplets and Irish twins Alex, born March 2005, Ebony, born January 2007 and my youngest, Crystal, was born November 2007.

We are one big, happy family and I'm hoping My kids will be just as close to each other like I am with my siblings.

anon173896
Post 153

Me and my sister are exactly 11 months apart.

I was born August, 1990, and she was born 11 months later, July, 1991. we are the same age for a month. Me and my sister are best friends, and almost identical. i love the fact that we share something. - IrishTwin1

anon171629
Post 152

My brother and I were born the same year. He was born January,1950 and I was born November,1950. It is really neat being the same age for a couple months!

anon166871
Post 151

Me and my little sister are Irish twins. We're both born in November, five days apart. When I was a little girl I was jealous how she was born earlier in the month than me. But as I grew older, I really liked my birth date. Haha, and I just recently found out about Irish twins! Also, when we we're little girls, my mom used to buy the same outfits for us. So people actually thought we were twins. By the way: I'm shorter than she is. Apparently she grows really fast! I hate it, people think I'm the youngest daughter.

But me and my little sister are really close and we tell each other everything! Sometimes it's weird, but we say the same things at once and we think the same things. It's like we're actually twins. It's cool though, but sometimes really weird!

anon163918
Post 150

I have not heard the term Irish Twin before and I find it fascinating. I was born in October 1989 and my sister was born September 1990 so we are 11 months and eight days apart.

She was a preemie. If not she would have been born in November and I would have been one month older. I do think that siblings who are that close in age are more closer to each other. I know my sister and I are close even more so because because my mom waited a year so I can go into kindergarten at the same time as my sister. So it was weird being older than everyone sometimes.

Not only that, but compared to the rest of my classmates. I have always behaved in a more mature way than them.

anon161642
Post 149

My brother was born in August 1970 and I was born July 1971. We are 11 1/2 months apart. From the second grade on we were in the same grade and everybody always assumed we were twins. I never heard the term "Irish Twins" until recently and I love it. My grandfather was born and raised in Ireland so I think the term fits and is not at all insulting.

anon160932
Post 148

I was born on my second brother's first birthday, my oldest brother was born one year and eleven days before my second brother-May 17, May 28, and May 28 of the following year. My dad's mother had her last child on January 22 of that same year, so my brothers were older than their uncle. Good Roman Catholic family.

anon160440
Post 147

anon149752 (138): Very happy for you. you have met a 1/2 sister and love her. However, to clear up a few misconceptions. Irish Twins, even though used in a derogatory sense in the past, has nothing to do with a mother's indiscretion. Irish twins are considered born of the same Mom also. A very Irish twin, triplet and quad if that's even something. Definitely Irish and proud of it.

anon159516
Post 146

My brother and I are "Irish twins" - we're 10 months apart. For two months out of the year, we're the same age. Our Mother swears that if one of us calls her, the other one calls at same the time. I think there's a bond you share when you're that close in age.

anon159315
Post 145

I had a set of twin girls. They were 14 weeks premature. Doing well now. And now I am 9 weeks pregnant with our third. The twins and the new baby will be 10 1/2 months apart, because I have to deliver 4 weeks early because of how my last c-section was done.

That also means my kids will be 7 1/2 months apart based on their 'corrected' age. My twins are still on corrected age for the next 2 years, as they will be developmentally behind for a little while. Even though they are 4 months old right now, they really are really like 5 week old babies.

Anyway, we didn't plan number third and can only laugh at this situation. Its going to be hard, but we welcome the new baby with open arms.

We do call them Irish triplets and we're all Irish. The girls and I all have red hair! I am not offended by this term.

anon158753
Post 144

I am the mother of Irish twins, my girls are 10 1/2 months apart. We didn't mean to have them so close. Since it took us over a year to get pregnant with our oldest, we didn't expect to get pregnant again right away. But now I am glad it happened that way! I am of Irish decent and I think it is silly to still consider the term derogatory. I think it is cute, and I'm proud to call my girls Irish twins!

anon158592
Post 143

At a recent dinner party we were discussing "Irish Twins". A lady, (Irish) proclaimed she had "Irish Twins", with birth dates 13 months apart. I knew she was dead wrong. To be an "Irish Twin," two births by the same mother have to be within 12 months. I know this because my mother was Irish and had "Irish Twins". My birthday is May 1950 and my sister May 1951. It was all my dad's doing. He was a compulsive neatnik. One cake with two names, the same number of gifts, etc.

anon157744
Post 142

The term is humorous and not derogatory in the least. I am an Irish twin and I'm not going to buy into a world view of victimhood like so many have. Don't be so silly. Stop encouraging people to be touchy and quick to take umbrage at things. It doesn't make the world a better place.

anon152868
Post 141

My mother and her sister were Irish twins, they did not have any other siblings, and they both married men who had fraternal twin sisters. My father also had sisters who were twins six years older than him and his twin so that his family was two sets of fraternal twins.

anon152241
Post 140

I was born in Feb 1989 and my twin brothers were born May '91, so we're Irish Triplets! Plus my partner is an "Irish I Don't Know What". His oldest sister was born Jan '86 (sadly deceased), older bro Dec '86, him Nov '87, younger sis May '89 and youngest sis Nov '91!

anon149752
Post 138

I recently discovered that I am an Irish Twin. My dad had an affair on my mum and produced a sister. I was born the first week of January 1956 and she was born the last week of December 1956. We have met and I love knowing her! Even though it hurt my mum, I'm happy to have my sister in my life. I know the term Irish Twin refers to the mother's indiscretion but in this case it was my dad's. Guess that still could apply.

anon147313
Post 137

I was born in Dublin as an identical twin. I also have an older brother who is less than a year older than me. All three of us are the same age for two weeks.

anon144563
Post 136

I think it is really neat to read all these comments! I have a set of twin girls and then we had a boy 11 months later. So, that makes Irish Triplets! I love it and couldn't be any more happier! We celebrate all three birthdays together, just like triplets would.

They are all three so close and they are the same size. Their birthdays are Nov 16 and then the twins Nov 19 of the previous year.

The youngest singleton was born on our oldest child's birthday almost exactly seven years to the minute. Her birthday was Nov 16 at 3:55 a.m. and he was born Nov 16 at 3:51 a.m. So we celebrate four birthdays on two different days but in the same week.

anon138469
Post 135

I'm an irish twin and proud of it. I was born in Febrary, 1950 and my sister in January, 1951. We are the same age for one month. We live a thousand miles away from each other now but we talk every day. She is my best friend.

anon135968
Post 134

I am both Irish and an Irish twin. I think its awesome. As a matter of fact its my brothers birthday today. We will both be 31 for the next 20 days. I am not offended by the term. It makes us interesting.

anon135338
Post 133

My brother, sister, and I (female) are Irish triplets. We are exactly 11 months, one week and one day from the other one. We are all extremely close with our thoughts. One of us doesn't have to say anything and the other two of us already know what the other is thinking. We are all an inch taller than the other one.

Our birthdays are also eight days apart. It goes youngest to oldest. My brother's is March 31, sister's April 8 of the previous year and mine is April 16 of the previous year. When I was younger I didn't understand why the other kids said they had brothers and sisters in the sixth grade when I was in the first with them. I just guessed they had a lot of brothers and sisters. I didn't know everyone's family wasn't like that.

But I wouldn't have it any other way. I've never met another family like mine. We happen to be almost full blooded Irish as well. Which makes it kind of fun. if my mother wasn't in the profession that she is now we wouldn't be so well off. I can't imagine what it would be like for my mother to not make as much as she does now. My father left when we were little so she is all we have ever had, but she did it all by herself. Can't love her enough!

anon135062
Post 132

This is quite interesting. I have a very close set of "Irish Twins". Born almost one year to the day apart. June 24 and June 23 the next year, both boys. When looking at pictures of them at the same age, they look like twins! If I were not their mother I would think it was the same baby in the pictures! Honestly, sometimes it is even hard for me.

My youngest one is exactly like my oldest one at this age, even down to their temperaments and everything. It's a crazy life, but I love it!

anon133915
Post 131

I have two boys born one year and five days apart and they seem to fight a lot, but they are always picking up for each other and even back each other up on everything. The older one always says that his younger brother is his baby and takes very good care of him when they play and when one gets hurt it seems like the other feels it and most of the the time they can't be apart. I love my boys.

anon131690
Post 130

I always knew growing up that I wanted twins. My great-grandmother had three sets of twins and two sets of triplets and one single birth. My grandmother, born when ggma was 45. My grandfather was a twin, his twin died at 10 days from jaundice. So growing up I only babysat for twins and triplets to prepare for the future.

I didn't get my wish but I have two boys Nov 95, and Oct 96. So I did end up with "Irish Twins". While everyone assumes they are actual twins they do not resemble each other at all. They are constantly arguing about everything. My aunt says that they are bonding. My answer is if they bond anymore they will become conjoined at the mouth.

Everything aside, they may be completely different but they do have their close moments.

I have raised them to know that they are Irish twins and to be proud of it. I planned my children and wanted to have them close together. I also have a daughter born in Dec 99. I am not catholic. We are also a very close family and would do anything to protect each other. That is what family is all about and I don't agree that the term Irish twins or Irish triplets is a derogatory term.

anon121930
Post 129

today is the first Ive ever heard the phrase "Irish Twins." My girls just turned 25 and 26, and they have always been incredibly close. In fact, they both married this year seven months apart. And yes my husband is 100 percent Irish. I wouldn't want it any other way!

anon117790
Post 128

i could see how it might sound like a bad thing. obviously it's not very kind to irish people and

i mean within just a couple of months of giving birth a woman gets pregnant again. people might draw conclusions about the woman. i don't see it as so bad though. it actually seems pretty common at least where I'm from.

my older siblings aren't quite irish twins or triplets but they are all born very close to each other '87,'88, and '90.

and i know a lot of kids in my school where their older sibling is just a grade ahead of them.

anon116152
Post 127

me my brother and sister are all a set. we are exactly a year and a half apart and rather close. countless times we have had a fair share of mischief, and now my brother and sister plan to follow in my leap into the United States Army.

anon115370
Post 126

My sister and I are Irish twins. She was born January 29th and I was born December 29th of the same year. We love this, for one month we are the same age and then she becomes the older sister.

anon113840
Post 125

I'm an irish twin, also irish, and live in ireland. i was born june 1995 and my brother may 1996. i think that means we are irish twins. anyway i was a twin but she died. The doctors could only save one of us. We were identical twins but we were in different sacs, but i don't know. i always feel like I'm missing my other half and am always looking for it. My zodiac sign is gemini the twins.

i need help or something. i think I'm going crazy and i have been having dreams about meeting my twin recently. i think I'm going to die soon.

anon112595
Post 124

I had a daughter first and then two years nine months later, I had twins; three children in less than three years. I think that qualifies me as having had Irish Triplets. I'll have to let my eldest know--she always felt left out of the twin phenomenon! I think she'll be pleased.

I always felt that when she came out of one phase of behavior, the twins went into it -- in stereo! Both hard and easy having children all close in age. But now they're all beautiful young women.

anon111357
Post 123

I have two kids that I carried full term. they were high risk and I almost lost them both on the exact day of different years.

I got stitched with my daughter and was on bed rest with both for five months.

I carried them both full term. I had my daughter January 2003 and my son December 2003. It's awesome. I call them my angel/irish twins. I also lost my first son in 2001.

anon110985
Post 122

I was always knew from being told my whole life that Ryan and I were "Irish Twins." I knew it meant we were close in age but never looked into the actual terminology or background of the term "Irish Twins" until today. It was quite fascinating actually to read about.

My mother gave birth to Ryan in March 1987 and I was born January, 1988. We are the same age for two and a half months out of the year: Jan., Feb. and March! My mother went in for her six week check up with Ryan when he was an infant, and it was at that appointment when she than learned that she was four weeks pregnant with me!

How I would've loved to see the look on my poor mother's face when they told her the news. So that's my story of "My Irish Twin and Me."

anon110402
Post 121

I will be having Irish twins in March 2011. My son was born March 2010 and I got pregnant two months after he was born. His Irish twin will be born March 2011. I hope they grow up close!

anon109907
Post 120

One of my friends said that he and his brother are irish twins and i didn't know what that was so i looked it up and read this as well as the irish triplets. Also found out that i have cousins that are irish triplets Oh, and all three of them are boys ranging in age of 3,4, and 5.

anon107344
Post 119

My brother was born in January of '85 and I was born in December of '85 so for 20 days we're the same age. It was always something special between us. Something no one else we knew had. Although we're not geographically close when we meet up it's like instant bonding all over again.

anon106526
Post 118

I was reading this. My dad always told me I was an Irish Twin so i decided to look it up. I am in fact mostly Irish and my brother and I were born on the exact same day but one year apart. I love it and we are super close and do look very similar to each other. We have been asked many times if we were twins.

anon106437
Post 117

I am the mother of "Irish twins". Someone once informed me of what it meant and my children and I use is as a term of endearment. My daughter was born April,1989 and my son was born March, 1990. We find it funny when people ask their age during the time they are the same age as they now look distinctly different from one another.

We are African American and they are the same age for about a month or so. My daughter was born a little early and my son was born a little late. They are still very close and are currently roommates and in their early 20's now. They did look very similar when they were growing up and I was asked a lot if they were twins. There were times when it was difficult but the overall experience of having children that you love, is worth all of the hard times. They have grown up to be really good people.

anon104739
Post 116

I was just reading this article, when it hit me that my brother and I are "Irish Twins." And the funny thing is, that we really are Irish.

My brother and I are seven months apart. His birthday is August 19th, and mine is March 21st. This is so exciting!

anon102965
Post 115

I'm an Irish twin. My sister was born in April 1970 and I was born in March 1971. We were raised as if we were twins and now I am the mother of Irish twins. My daughter was born in September 2002 and my son was born in August 2003. I wouldn't want it any other way. They are very close and I hope they maintain that relationship!

anon100979
Post 114

i also just heard about irish twins so i looked it up. my sister and i are irish twins. i was born august, 1961 and she was born august, 1962. i also have two sisters who are only one year apart. so what would all this mean? one sister was born march, 1959, the other was born july, 1960.

anon97617
Post 113

I first heard the term "Irish twins" from Henry Howley, who attended Archbishop Williams High School and played hockey at Harvard around 1987. He was fond of his brother about eleven months younger - the family were Irish and proud of it - nothing derogatory about it!

anon93580
Post 112

My brother and I are 10.5 months apart. He was born late May of 1981 and I early April of 1982. He used to hate it because everyone thought we were twins and I used to torture him about it.

I would tell him i wouldn't listen to anyone who wasn't at least one full year older than me. I was born prematurely so technically he should be 13 months older than me but patience has never been one of my virtues. Now that we are older he doesn't let it get to him. He uses it as ammunition to remind me just exactly how old I am.

I love my brother very much and this is just one of those things that keeps us that much closer.

anon93557
Post 111

Please help. I just heard this term for the very first time today and started researching, as I liked the term -- not taken derogatory here! I have three boys, but my question is regarding my two oldest: Sept 1, 1999 and Sept 6, 2000 - Irish twins, or not? Thanks for any comments regarding this post, in advance!

anon93336
Post 110

I have Irish twins. Mikey was born in April 2009 and Leland was born in April 2010. So far things have run smoothly. I know that will change once they're older. I don't worry about college because we have funds set up for them.

I am also an Irish twin. I was born February, 1977 and my brother was born Feb, 1978. We have never gotten along but I feel it is his attitude and not our ages that keep us apart. He has been the bad sheep of the family since birth and I don't feel that our births have anything to do with it.

anon91616
Post 109

My sister an I are irish twins, and see nothing wrong with it. she was born in Jan. 82 and me in Oct. 82 so for about three months we are the same age. It's fun, messing with people. I love it.

anon90704
Post 108

I just heard this term today for the first time in 38 years. My brother and I are Irish Twins. He was born May, 1971 and I was born May, 1972. We have never gotten along. To this day, we haven't spoken in 11 plus years. Sad, yes, but if you actually knew him, you would understand.

anon89983
Post 107

My sister and I are irish twins. I was born August 1990. She was born September 1989. We're not exactly close to each other, in our relationship or in location.

anon88908
Post 106

As an only child, I was always jealous of children who had siblings, since from my point of view they always had someone to play with, and I was often lonely.

I have always been fascinated by the twin relationship, and their special bond. As a school counselor, I find boy-girl twin relationships especially interesting. For that and other more prosaic reasons, my husband and I adopted two children from Guatemala born six months apart. My son was born in January 2006 and my daughter was born in July 2006, so for half the year they are the same age. They are in the same preschool class and will be in the same grade in school. My son is small and wiry, and my daughter is actually slightly taller and heavier than he. They are almost always together and have lots of fun together. They fight or argue (usually briefly) at least once a day, just like other siblings, and love each other dearly the rest of the time.

People assume they are twins and often ask me when we are out if they are. If I don't know the person and won't see them again, I just say, "Yes, they are." If I have or expect to have ongoing contact with the person, I tell them the actual circumstances.

It bothered me for a little while because I thought I was violating my children's right to privacy and to tell their own story, but then I realized that all anyone has to do is to look at my fair-skinned husband and they will probably already assume the kids are adopted!

I refer to them as Irish twins, and often people already know what that means and laugh. I've never heard anyone say it could be considered offensive.

I know it refers to the fact that Irish Catholic families often have, or had, large families with children spaced closely, but I always thought of the term as kind of tongue-in-cheek and teasing, not insulting.

I guess I could say "Latin twins" like a previous poster, but as someone of Western European descent myself, I run the risk of that being viewed as insulting and against my own kids' ethnicity at that.

But anyway, my kids enjoy each other and they don't like to be separated for too long, although we do try to remember to do that at least once a week!

They play pretend games and run long scenarios in which they feed each other "lines" to say. They have the kind of fun and loving relationship I always hoped they would.

anon88903
Post 105

Regarding having two or more kids in college at the same time, if it makes anyone feel any better, you generally come out ahead in the long term. This is because having more than one child in college results in a lower EFC (expected family contribution) and so qualifies you for potentially more financial aid.

anon87804
Post 104

I find the last sentence in your opening paragraph to be quite confusing considering the name of this site.

Are you unaware that the term "Geek" was coined in a derogatory fashion? Originally used for people so odd that they should have a carnival act, the word found a new meaning in the 70s as technology and scientific knowledge increased. Certain cliques needed a word to define these socially inept people who preferred the company of “flashing lights” to members of their own species.

I can jest at this because I consider myself a geek. I'm fully aware of the negative connotations it had and still has to some people. But some people take offence to the word “short.” (Of which I'm in that category as well.) I don't think that just because someone at some point took offence, or even intended offence by use of a certain words means that it should leave the common (polite) vocabulary.

For, in fact, if we did blacklist all words that were begot from man's darker side or dwelt there at some point, I’d venture a guess that 50 percent or more of the nouns commonly spoken in the world today would be “stricken from polite conversation”.

Don't get me wrong. I completely agree with you that we shouldn’t use words to offend anyone, but what I'm endeavoring to do is point out the difference between using a term as a weapon as opposed to the use of it as a description. The first is only in rare cases (for I personally restrict my use of the word never) acceptable, the latter is most often used as a simple means of communication.

So what I’m saying is that it's intent, not the word itself, that is dangerous and hurtful. We as humans, need to adjust our feelings and motives rather than our vocabulary. Restricting the use of a word and not doing anything about the hateful feelings of those using it, is akin to treating the symptoms and not the disease. This will only result in the coining or redefining of a new term to be just as derogatory.

Hate can be, and usually is, a cruel, overwhelming and obsessively consuming emotion, and those words that are used in hate can have detrimental effects, not only on the target, but also on the witnesses and even on the wielder.

The pen and the sword are historical rivals, both tools we homo sapiens are so fond of using, but like any tool, from a wheel to a gun, a remark can build or destroy.

Choosing to take offence to a word used to describe, is the problem of the offended. If the wielder is wrong and the term doesn't apply, such as calling someone gay when they are not, then the person who is the target should choose to take no more offense than when someone calls an elephant a bird. For when you take offense to a word that a person used a term to describe, especially when the user is apathetic or ignorant of its origin, simply because you remember the hate someone else intended in its usage, just keeps the hate alive and growing.

I do understand that some words are coined or redefined to definitions that hold such newly raw, painful emotions, that even if the person doesn't take offence, the emotional memory is profound enough to cause a distraction from any communication. And I entreat the speaker to be aware of this, and to temporarily refrain from the use of those words, because in this case, to continue my medical metaphor from above, even though I support that we shouldn't choose to treat the disease in this fashion, we shouldn't ignore the symptoms and just not prolong the pain while working on the disease; the symptoms will heal on their own.

It's important to understand that words used in hate are a different matter and in this article I make no comment, suggestion or judgment on any action a person might take, for dealing with hate. It is outside the scope of this work. However, I implore you to listen and endeavor to seek understanding before taking offense, and to take none where none is given, because, hate is the enemy, not our fellow man.

anon87198
Post 103

I first heard this term when I told my aunt I was expecting again. I have a little girl born February 2010, and now am expecting another little one in December 2010. I'm very excited to have two little ones so close in age!

anon83358
Post 102

Several decades ago, my husband was born an "Irish Twin". He was born in February and his younger brother was born in December of the same year: exactly 10 months & 10 days apart. They are 'Mexican American' "Irish Twins" and they are the fourth born and fifth born of 10 lovable children. Seven boys and three girls.

anon83121
Post 101

My brother and I are Irish twins and I think it is wonderful! He was born on my very first birthday. That is incredibly special to me. We have a wonderful friendship that is almost 52 years old! I can understand how the term may have started, but as many things in life change, this term does too. I am not insulted, but honored to have an Irish twin.

anon81360
Post 100

my two youngest children are nine months apart. i got pregnant with my son two months after i had my daughter and had him the first week of my seventh month and for for two months they share the same age. he just turned 17 in april and her b day is in june.

anon79891
Post 99

Derogatory? Maybe to a lawyer from the ACLU! I'd hate to be in the room for more than five seconds for anyone so thin-skinned as to take offense. Irish Catholics ashamed at having kids and not using birth control? Gasp. Maybe they see kids as more of a blessing than a financial curse. College tuition? It's called getting a scholarship. Geesh. I need a whiskey shot and some potatoes.

anon79147
Post 98

Me and my sister are irish twins i was born june 1995 she was born june 1996. we stay the same age for a week and a day.

anon77419
Post 97

My family is full of Irish twins-I don't think people in todays society really see this as a derogitory comment. My grand parents had 3 sets of Irish twins and that was just on my mothers side. My other grandmother who gave birth to 14 kids, had many sets of Irish twins. Embrace the fact that your family is so close to each other. We do and we are Irish as well!

anon77238
Post 96

Me and my sister are irish twins too! I was born January, 1991 and she was born November, 1991. That's my favorite sister!

anon76225
Post 95

My sister and I are Irish twins! She was born December 1988 and i was born in December 1989!

anon74136
Post 94

My little sister just turned 50 yesterday, the first day I, too, heard the term Irish Twin. We're 11 months apart. I was born April, 1959 and she was born March, 1960.

I started thinking and realized that I'm actually an Irish Triplet. I have another sister born 17 months before me, November, 1957, making the three of us born within a three year period of time! That's so cool.

The three of us were very close growing up (we also have a sister born in July, 1954) We're a catholic family too. Proud of being Catholic and proud of being an Irish Triplet!

anon73397
Post 93

Wow,I knew my brother and I were Irish twins, both born in 1977, but it's neat to know that my three younger girls, born 04/99, 03/00 and 03/01 are Irish triplets. I thought that the children had to be born in the same year, not within 12 months. So even my two born 04/99 and 03/00 are Irish twins. Cool, they got a kick out of it too :) It's terrible the "derogatory orgin" of it though. Hmmmm!

anon72461
Post 92

My daughter was born in Feb 2005 and my son was born in Dec 2005.. They're so close and sometimes very inseparable they are bright fun loving teenagers now. I'm very proud of them. I get a kick out of people who think they are actual twins.

anon71176
Post 91

if "irish twins" is considered derogative -- which i never knew it was until today, then what is the "politically correct", if any!, term for siblings or triplets, etc, that are born within a year of each other?

anon69384
Post 89

My brother and I are Irish Twins. I am about 11 months older than him. He has mild dyslexia. Does it mean that I have it too?

anon68876
Post 88

I have two boys who are ten months apart, and what a joy it is! I just love them so much and they get along just great! peace out. --star.

nomees
Post 87

my girl/boy twins were born in may 2004 and in may 2005 my baby boy was born on their first birthday. This was a wonderful surprise. Now that they're getting older they look and seem to all be on the same page and are a force to be reckoned with. hahaha. But the bond they have and the love they share is so special and unique and most of all strong. Just curious if anyone else can relate.

anon65879
Post 86

I'm the proud mom to Irish twins. My daughter was born September 2008 and my son was born August 2009. Right now my daughter is showing him who's boss but I'm sure they'll eventually get along.

anon65153
Post 84

had my daughter in August Of 1962 and twin boys in July of 1963. so does that mean I have Irish triplets?

anon63134
Post 83

We almost have Irish twins. They are 13 months and one day apart. My daughter was born in June 2008 and my son in July 2009. Also, we are expecting another little one due in August! We will be very busy but it is very fun.

Big sister loves her little brother and is already very protective of him at 19 months only. A good idea is to get the older sibling their own baby and stroller. It is preferable to have a bottle for the doll also, or pacifier because she always wants to try to feed her brother. This seems to help a lot!

anon62491
Post 82

i have irish boys. The first boy born in March 2002 and the other in January, 2003, 10 months apart. They are the same age for just about two months. Daily I am asked if they are twins. I thought it was neat to find out they were called Irish Twins. I am blessed to have these boys as well as my daughter. I am thankful every day.

anon61905
Post 81

I have Irish triplets. they are 15, 16 and 17. I find nothing wrong in this term and i use it all the time so i say yeah to all of us who have Irish twins or triplets in our family.

anon61324
Post 80

While, technically, an irish twin has to be born within 12 months of his so termed counterpart, my boys were born 15 months apart, and we still consider them, and call them "Irish twins". Regardless of the rules, they both attend the same classes (same year in school) and people think they are nonidentical twins anyway, so we started calling them Irish twins and they love it. They tell everyone they are Irish twins and they are very proud of this.

I also tell people that my entire family of nine brothers and sisters are all Irish twins because we are all born about a year apart, and I tell people my mother was pregnant for 10 years straight.

On top of that, (you might have guessed it) I am Irish. My parents are both of full blooded irish descent. As far as the derogatory implications of not using birth control, the traditional Irish Catholic is predisposed to the "Rhythm Method" of birth control, for religious reasons, not because of anything else.

In the Irish view, it is against God to put anything between the Sacrament of Marriage and the possible inconvenience of raising children. If viewed in that manner, it can be seen that this is a conscious decision, and not a lack of planning.

The rhythm method dictates that sex will never result in any obstruction to the possibility of conception, other than to not have sex on days when the woman is most fertile, so there is a "rhythm" to the times at which sex will take place as far as the calendar days involved, since the system revolves around the times at which a woman's egg is prime for fertilization. So, this "time" is avoided, unless it is preferred, and so because of this strategy, it is in fact, a method of birth control, so whoever suggested originally that there is a lack of birth control is uninformed. Instead, it might be better suggested that the Irish just love to have big families, and love having children in the house, without which, their "family" would not be complete.

anon61315
Post 79

I was informed today that using the term Irish twins was derogatory. I was in total disbelief because I thought it was just a part of popular culture.

It looks like most posters here see it as just a descriptor of very-close-in-time siblings. I did not intend to insult anyone. I wonder if there are still people around who see it as an insult?

anon60566
Post 78

My daughter and son are irish twins as well. My daughter was born in May 2005 and my son was born in April 2006. Whenever people ask their ages we also throw in there that they are less than a year apart.

anon58557
Post 76

My daughters are called irish twins. it got to a point when both of them will speak at the same time even new what each other felt.

It was funny because me and my older brother know how each other feels and we live in different cities, but we knew what we were going through and i did not know we were irish twins till they told me about it. lol. it is nice to know the terms.

anon58143
Post 75

That's me! My sister was born on nov 6th then i was born nov 6th the next year.

anon56913
Post 74

My sister and I are Irish twins, we are 11 months apart. Every year from February 11 to March 6, we are the same age, and now my niece, my sister's only daughter is going to have Irish twins, she has a baby boy, and when he was two months old she found out that she was pregnant again, and it looks like she is now having twins.

anon56480
Post 73

My sister and I are the same age for three weeks every year and I have always teased her that we are twins during this period every year. I just found out today after 35 years on this earth that we are considered Irish twins. I love this.

anon55626
Post 72

My brother and I are "Irish Twins." Nowadays, the term does not mean you are Irish -- it just refers to two siblings born 12 months or less apart. I'm hispanic, so we are also called "Latin Twins" due to the same thinking behind big hispanic families having children with little time in between.

I was born in November, 1982, and my brother was born in October, 1983, so we're the same age for a month and a couple of weeks. :0)

anon53459
Post 71

I do have an irish twin. My brother was born Sept 11 and 11 months to the day I was born on Aug 11. We get asked by everyone if we our twins, still by people who had grown up with us.

We are super close. we fight a lot but we usually just forget it the next day and are best friends again. I now use 11 as my lucky number.

anon53173
Post 70

Just found out that my brother and I are considered Irish Twins as he was born 11 months after me.

I also never thought about the fact that we are the same age for about a month. I was the honeymoon baby. So funny and guess what? Both my parents are also identical twins. Crazy!

anon52214
Post 69

My father was born on November 10th. His brother was born on November 10th the next year. I now have a cousin who had a baby boy on November 10th and is the grandson of my uncle. How odd do you think that is, 75 years later?

anon51459
Post 68

I have Irish twin boys. both of my kids are Americans, but people tell me all the time that they are really Irish twins because they are nine months apart. yes, it is possible! I got pregnant with my second baby when my first baby was one month old. also, my second baby was born four weeks premature so that's why they are exactly nine months apart. So everywhere we go people always say, "Oh! look at those twins," but when i explain they are not, people say they are "Irish twins."

meganmcl16
Post 67

I myself am an Irish twin. My brother and I were born 7 1/2 months apart from each other. (June 1991 to February 1992.) As it turns out we are both 50 percent Irish, and have always been called the Irish Twins. My father even said we missed the World Book of Records by a week, however I am not sure how true that is. I do not think it's insulting in anyway to be given that name. we are both perfectly healthy and normal teenagers.

anon50087
Post 66

hey! i'm 15 and i'm an irish twin with my brother. we fight a lot. my dad thinks its hilarious, but we're close. but my parents have never told me about my family even related to us from ireland?

anon49976
Post 65

This is so cool to me. i am a regular twin, born on the same day in the same year and i have always been facinated by multiples. I want to have twins when i get older in the same year with another child. They would be twins and irish triplets. :)

anon49400
Post 64

While it may have originated as a derogatory term, it seems that those who either are Irish twins or have Irish twins (my first two children were born just under 11 months apart), don't find the term insulting. I, too, was asked if they were twins, and still at the ages of 12 and 13 they look like they could be. They like being Irish twins, except the oldest one doesn't like being the same age as her brother for a month!!! (but the younger one loves it!) I'm proud to be Catholic and I'm proud of my Irish twins.

anon49383
Post 63

my two daughters were born on 19th january 2008 and 05 december 2008 ... they are 10 months and 21 months. they are best mates already even though my eldest daughter has started nursery already before her 2nd birthday ....... they love each other

anon49034
Post 62

what a bunch of crap. i thought this irish twin thing was a lie but yet my sister proved me wrong once again.

anon47567
Post 61

I guess I can consider myself to have "Irish Triplets", my first son born September 2007, my second was born Sept. 2008, and my third son was born August 2009. My husband would love to know that he can say he has Irish triplets as he is Irish. I get asked if the boys (the two older boys) are twins and when I tell them no and the boys ages they look at me like I'm crazy. But the boys are really close already and it's a joy to see them play together. I wouldn't change anything for the world.

anon47054
Post 60

My brother and I were born 5 years apart to the day, and we are Irish. not sure if that counts for anything.

anon46621
Post 59

I am a mother of irish twins. My daughter was born January, 1999 and my son was born December, 1999 in the same calendar year. I have heard different names for babies born in a 12 month period and different years is called singleton twins. I loved having my children close. They are really close to one another. I also have had people ask me if they where twins. They are 10 months three weeks apart.

anon45939
Post 58

I am the proud mother of Irish twins. My son was supposed to be born on Mother's Day, but didn't make it. He was born in May, 1996. Then when he was six months old, I found out I was going to have my daughter. She was born April, 1997. So, on my first "official" Mother's Day I had two beautiful babies.

anon45397
Post 57

I have *true* Irish Twins in my family.I have two cousins; one was born on January 10 and his sister was born on December 16 in the same calendar year.

anon44025
Post 56

I definitely have irish twins. I have two sons who were born in april. One was born april 1993 and the other in april 1994, so as anyone can see i truly have irish twins.

anon43408
Post 55

I have never heard the term Irish Twins until today. That's when I discovered that I had Irish Twins. My son was born in 1973, and my daughter was born in 1974. People used to ask if they were twins. Now I can say "yes, they are Irish Twins".

anon42961
Post 54

I am an Irish twin. My brother was born in September 1976 and when my mom went back for her six-week check up she found out she was pregnant with me. I was born in September 1977. My wife and I almost had a set as well. Our daughter was born in March 2008 and we are expecting to deliver another baby September 2009.

anon42724
Post 53

Well, my husband's sister has a daugther born in January and a son born in December 2008. My husband and I just had a baby girl in May and we just found out that we are pregnant again, which would make them 11 months apart. My husband also has older girls who are 15 months apart. I'm not Irish, but my husband is. It's really neat to see that there are so many of us out there.

anon42658
Post 52

My daughter was born in March 2009, and my next child is due in March 2010. The first one was planned, the second was an oopsie, but we'll see when we get there if they're "true" "Irish twins".

anon42646
Post 51

Never knew it was a bad connotation, but we never had people getting on us about it. My brother is 360 days younger than me so we usually have a joint birthday in the middle two days after his, two days before mine. We just did it for the first time today in a long time. It's always been fun, and we ended up in the same grade. For us it was my being born three months early and my brother coming out four days before my birthday. Kind of funny actually. Developmentally I needed another year so we were always together and people assumed we were real twins. Was fun sometimes. Was a tomboy so they thought we were twin boys a lot. I don't mind being this close to my brother, and have never seen it as a bad thing. Makes us special, like everyone else who posted here as an Irish twin.

anon42046
Post 50

Ok everyone: an irish twin is born within a year of each other, not 13 months apart not 12 months and 1 day apart (please read the article), but within a year of each other.

anon41899
Post 49

Hi. Im an irish twin..sort of. My sister and i are 13 months apart. But we are a year, a month and a day apart. I was born sept 14 1990 and she was born oct 15 1991. We are half irish. she looks like she just got off the boat from ireland. I look polish. We are very close and i love her very much. I wouldn't have it any other way. - mary sister to lisa.

anon41030
Post 48

Two children, the oldest born April 9 and the second born Feb. 14, that makes them 10 months and 5 days apart. I think that counts for Irish Twins?

anon40266
Post 47

i have a set of identical twin girls born in december and then i had non-identical twins, a girl and a boy, in october, so i have 2 sets of twins and they both sets are also irish twins.

anon39431
Post 46

I have Irish twins girls! I never knew the true meaning of Irish twins until now. It's great for their birthdays it's one big party in august.

their dad is irish and italian and i am German, Irish and italian. I wouldn't have it any other way. It's a great way to raise children. Also they are and i believe will always be there for each other no matter what. One thing that is odd: they are almost total oppisites. but it is great I thank god for them every day.

anon37426
Post 45

Well it looks like a majority of people don't find ther term derogatory at all. I'm an irish twin and I'm part Irish too. Glad today's world no longer looks on the Irish in such a negative way. I always said that my parents were so thrilled with how I came out that they wanted to start again ASAP. --Marc, brother of Jeff.

anon37083
Post 44

Hi, my husband and I have 3 little girls. Our second and third little girls are very close in age. One in september 2003, and the baby in August 2004.We always said that to people about them being Irish Twins. And now have the confirmation that what we said is true. I think its kind of neat!!

anon36501
Post 43

I have 2 kids both born in the same year,my son was born on january 9,1986 and my daughter was born december 18,1986....So i quess that makes them irish twins...I never knew this...This is wonderful..I have irish twins!

anon36355
Post 42

on my dads side of the family there's a set of irish twins. both of my uncles are born in the exact same year only 11 months apart. one is born in january & the other is born in december which i really didn't know about that at all. well im not really surprised about that either because there's 10 boys & a girl in that family

anon35956
Post 41

I have 2 boys that are irish twins born Oct 2006 and Sept 2007. It can be exhausting at times, but I wouldn't trade it for the world! They play together and watch out for each other. Many people say "You are lucky, they have a best friend"!

anon35621
Post 40

My brother and I are "Irish Twins". For the month of August, we are the same age. I was born September 1979 and he was born July 1980.

anon35262
Post 39

i have a set of "irish twins" my first one was born January 6th 2006 and the other was born January 10th 2007. i learned about irish twins when i went to my first ultrasound and the ultrasound tech told me about irish twins. it can be very hard at times, but they are very close. its like they're best friends. we wouldnt have it any other way. they are blessings from God, and our job is to take care and raise them according to His word.

anon35110
Post 38

I have a set of Irish Twins. My son was born March 27, 2004 and my daughter Jan. 21, 2005. I first heard of Irish Twins just after I delivered my daughter. i thought it was neat I told everyone "Hey I have Irish Twins". I am half Irish and half German.

anon34761
Post 37

I have known about the term for a couple of years, but never knew it was considered a negative one. My sister and i are born in the same year(1977), i always thought that was pretty cool, still do. An acquaintance let me know of the term and i heard it used in a movie. It sounds silly but i still love to see the look on peoples faces when i explain about my sister and i, they usually ask if we are step-siblings, but we are not.

Patz
Post 36

I was looking up the meaning of Irish Twins as I had met a brother and sister whom called themselves Irish Twins and when I asked them why they explained they were born less then a year apart. I had tears come to my eyes as I realized that myself and my brother were Irish Twins as we were ten and a half months apart...him December 13th 1951 and myself November 4th 1952. He was also born being with a faulty heart valve and he died when he was 9 and myself 8. I have felt lost without him...I still cry and am very sensitive about his death. With him being not healthy and my being healthy..I was always taking care and taking up with him with others. I am have tears running down my face as I am writing this. I always felt we were very closely bonded but I thought it was because I was always looking out for him. Now, I think maybe we were bonded closer than the usual siblings. I do have other siblings and I have a brother whom was born 3 months before my Irish Twin died and have always felt very close to him. Thanks for letting me share.

TNmom
Post 35

Believe it or not, I heard this expression for the first time today (used in a movie).

My brother was born Jan. 19, 1955, I was born Jan. 8, 1956, and my sister was born Dec. 30, 1956. So I guess that makes us Irish triplets!!! Oh, and btw---both parents had some Irish in them!

anon33364
Post 34

I myself and my sister were born 11 months to the day apart... Me- January 18 and her- December 18.

irish63
Post 33

anon24820 the words you need to read are the ones before "OR".

The term “Irish twins” is used to describe two children born to the same mother within 12 months of each other "or" born in the same calendar year.

anon30759
Post 31

Well I'm a mother of soon to have Irish twins, I already have a 9 month old. She was born July 21, 2008 and my other baby is coming June 22, 2009. The first time I heard this term of Irish Twins I felt proud, even though I'm proud of being Hispanic with Guatemalan and Salvadorian blood, and I say it with a smile on my face and with honor. Oh and anybody out there has an advice for me on how to handled Irish Twins please post a comment, especially for me being a single mother. It's not that I was naive and didn't know of birth control. It's very surprising for my doctor and I to find out that I was pregnant. We both knew that I was on birth control pills. Thank you and hope hearing from you soon.

anon30685
Post 30

I have a son that was born dec. 20, 2007 and a daughter that was born nov. 29, 2008...they are Irish twins.

anon30417
Post 29

Or it could just be because the Irish used to have more kids. My Italian grandmother in Philadelphia has referred to my father and his brother as "Irish twins." If it was really that derogatory, she wouldn't use it like that.

anon30073
Post 28

Wow, are you reading into this one! My sister and I are Irish twins, Catholic and proud of it. People are waaaay too sensitive these days. Yes, it's true that the Irish were once looked down upon in this country, but now who doesn't want to be part Irish? Times change and so do the meanings of words and sayings. I don't see anything derogatory in this phrase.

anon29442
Post 27

It's pretty strange to read that the term "Irish Twins" is derogatory. It's also kind of funny to me, I guess. My brother and I are 363 days apart. I'm the older of the two, but his birthday is before mine. I was born May 8th, 1988, and he was born May 6th, 1989. I've never heard of Irish Triplets though. That's kind of a scary thought to me; three children within a year of one another. Then again, you learn something new every day.

anon28675
Post 26

You know, These terms that negatively depict the Irish are rarely heard anymore. I had never heard of 'Irish Confetti' or 'Irish Kiss'. I wonder if my great grandmother (who immigrated from Ireland) felt the sting of these comments?

anon28656
Post 25

I just now heard that term on television. This woman refers to her children being Irish twins. I found it interesting that it's a derogatory meaning. My brother and I would be Irish twins, he is Jan 65 and I am Dec 65. My other two older brothers were Nov 22, 62 and Nov 26, 63. We aren't Irish, but are Catholic. I will tell my brother that he and I are Irish twins.

anon28504
Post 24

My sister-in-law had a 9 month old when she had her twins born, would she then have Irish Triplets?

anon28436
Post 23

I have two sons, the first one adopted, one biological, that are 369 days apart. We surprisingly got pregnant 6 weeks after adopting our son, who was 6 weeks old at the time. We didn't think we could have a biological child, but now we do. We consider ourselves blessed to have one child each through adoption and pregnancy, and wouldn't trade either experience for anything. Of course, we love both children equally.

anon27786
Post 22

are me and my sister Irish twins since we are only 9 moths apart? not born in the same year though. she was born in December in 1984 and i was born in September 1985. we are from the same mom.

anon25684
Post 21

My daughters are Irish Twins, Aug 23 and Aug 9... I'm currently expecting again and it will be within a year of the last. So what do I have? Two sets of Irish Twins? Or Irish Triplets?

anon25514
Post 20

Posted by: anon24820

"Ok so some of you posters who say you are Irish twins aren't... in the article it says 2 siblings that are born within the same calendar year like January 25 2008 and December 2 2008 then you would be Irish twins... please do us all a favor and read the article before you post."

Or it means you were born within 12 months of each other, so perhaps you should also read the article.

anon25413
Post 19

I must have Irish Quadruplets....I've had four children in less than 4 years...15, 11, and 14 months apart!

anon25334
Post 18

Ok Anon24820, Maybe you need to go back and look at the article a little closer. It says "The term “Irish twins” is used to describe two children born to the same mother within 12 months of each other OR born in the same calendar year." Let's be nice.

anon24820
Post 17

Ok so some of you posters who say you are Irish twins aren't... in the article it says 2 siblings that are born within the same calendar year like January 25 2008 and December 2 2008 then you would be Irish twins... please do us all a favor and read the article before you post.

jerseygirl02
Post 16

Hi I'm a Irish twin. There are 3 sets of irish twins in my family. My sister and i are 11 months and 10 days apart, My son and daughter are 11 months and 10 days apart too, and my father inlaw and his brother are also 11 months and 10 days apart. and i love it!!!!

anon24496
Post 15

My brother and I are Irish twins. I was born Aug 13 1966 and he was born August 13 1967 exactly one year apart! we grew up close, I guess like twins.

and we actually share the same Birthday

anon23948
Post 13

I found out that my brothers were born within three years of each other! We're Irish triplets!

anon23758
Post 12

While I am not a irish twin, I was looking up term, because here in the Detroit area, there is a mom that just had a set of twin boys---one was born a few minutes before midnight on Dec. 31, 2008, the other was born a few minutes after midnight on Jan 1, 2009. They also have another boy that was born in Jan. 2008! Thought that was interesting.

Now try explaining that one to people when they get older! The new twins have were born different month, date and year. The older sibling has the same month as one of his siblings, but different year & than shares the same year with the 2nd baby, but different month! Confused???

anon23205
Post 11

My brother and I are Irish Twins. I was born January of 1972 and he was born December of 1972. We are 10 1/2 months apart.

spotochic
Post 10

I just found out that my brother and I are Irish Twins! He was born August 24, 1990 and I was born August 13, 1991, we are 11 months and 11 days apart. I was super excited when i found out, i would have never guessed that me and my brother would be considered twins!

mande724
Post 9

I have two boys that are Irish twins. They are 11 months apart. I never new of the term until my doctor told me. I loved reading the comments. I learned that I'm not the only one that gets asked if they are twins. Almost every day! I also use the term freely. I never knew that it is politically incorrect. I will still tell people that they're Irish twins with a smile.

anon20338
Post 8

Hi, I'm nearly 50 and am an Irish Twin. Yes, i was teased as a child and teenager, then one day I woke up and thanked my mom and dad for even having me. I concluded that it was a blessing I was even here. My parents had several options with three small children already and a fourth one on the way just nine months after my brother. He was born in January of 1959 and I was born in November the same year. To this day people question if we are twins. I can imagine it was very very difficult for my mother who was young herself (24). However, I wish I could say I was closer to my brother. I don't consider it derogatory at all, I consider it a blessing from two parent who cared.

Cegtalk2u
Post 7

I have Irish twin Boys. They are 10 months and 11 days apart. It is a lot like having regular twins. But there is definitely a difference in age developmentally. They are almost 4 and 5 now and they are the same wight and height. I get asked constantly if they are twins and when I explain to them they are Irish twins the majority of people have never heard of the term. The boys have a normal sibling relationship and I don't believe they feel each other's pain like you hear normal twins do.

anon16154
Post 6

My sister and I are one hour to be a year apart. She was born September 27, 1986 and I was born September 26, 1987. Everyone confuses us of being twins. We love it. We're inseparable when were together and love celebrating our birthdays together. We love being the same age for one day..

stargirl4
Post 5

my brother was born on august 26 1990 and i was born on august 26 1991. does this make us irish twins? i wasnt really sure because i had never heard this term until the other day and when i looked it up it said that irish twins were born less than 12 months apart but we are exactly 12 months apart so i wasnt sure if it was the same or if it was something different

momof2
Post 4

My sister and I are Irish twins as well as my younger brother. we are Irish triplets.

anon14818
Post 3

My sister and i share a birthday. She is younger than me and she was born in the morning. I was born at night and so on our birthday we are twins for the day. i love my sister and i am not insulted by being called irish twin by other people, neither is she. I think of it as im irish and i have a sister that looks like my twin.

anon11836
Post 2

Hi my name is stephanie and i'm 16 years old and i also have a brother born the same year and i just recently found out were irish twins which is weird but funny and some facts are actually true we are so close we do everything together, we even hang out together in lunch weird but yea and we both can't do anything with out the other but i think the most difficult part is were both juniors and are graduating next year and we both are planning for college and it will be hard especially since we both play basketball for our high school lol

anon11365
Post 1

My sister and I are Irish twins as well as my two older brothers. My family descended from Ireland and well, we're one big Catholic family. I couldn't be closer to my sister and this article was right about the poor planning. My poor mother. :) She already had to pay for both my brothers schooling at the same time now she is currently paying for both my sister and I.

If anything, I wouldn't change anything. We are happy, close and it couldn't be better.

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