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What Is a Conniption Fit?

Sudden, violent outbursts can be referred to as conniption fits.
Someone with histrionic personality disorder might have a conniption fit.
A child having a conniption fit.
Anger can occur during a conniption fit, but is generally seen as being less intense during a "hissy" fit.
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  • Originally Written By: Michael Pollick
  • Revised By: G. Wiesen
  • Edited By: Bronwyn Harris
  • Last Modified Date: 26 July 2014
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A conniption fit is a sudden, violent emotional outburst generally triggered by shocking news or an unexpected turn of events. This is typically a slang or informal term, with American origins though the exact source of the phrase is unknown. It can be used with other expressions like "hissy fit" or "tantrum," though there are subtle differences between each of these outbursts.

Basic Meaning

Unlike a tantrum, which could be triggered with little outside provocation, a conniption fit is often an anticipated response to incredibly bad or disappointing news. For example, someone who is already running late for an important meeting, and then encounters a road block on the way to it, may go into "conniptions." It is generally characterized by a tirade of strong language accompanied by signs of frustration, rage, and even sadness. Sometimes a person having a conniption fit is reduced to stutters and incomprehensible sounds or phrases.

Usage and Differences from Similar Terms

Some people use "conniption fit" interchangeably with other descriptors such as "temper tantrum" or "hissy fit." While each phrase can describe a violent emotional outburst, there are some subtle differences. An emotionally immature person experiencing frustration or disappointment is likely to have a temper tantrum. For example, a child who drops an ice cream cone might have such a tantrum.

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A person with a histrionic personality or poor anger management skills might have a hissy fit when faced with disappointment or denial, a response generally seen as immature or inappropriate for the situation. In contrast to this, however, a conniption fit could be triggered whenever an otherwise rational person is confronted with an irrational set of circumstances. Under such conditions, an emotional response may very well be anticipated, although many people see a conniption fit as an inappropriate momentary lapse of reason regardless of the cause.

Source for "Conniption"

The origins of the term "conniption fit" are not exactly clear, although many sources place the first known usage around the 1830s. Some people theorize the word "conniption" is literally a corruption of the word "corruption," which at one time described feelings of anger or sadness. Others believe the word "conniption" was formed as a nonsense word, suggesting a mock Latin origin, or reflecting the types of sounds that might be voiced during such a fit.

There was also an informal English word, canapsha, which had roughly the same meaning as "conniption" in the early 19th century. It is even possible that the phrase "conniption fit" arose from the Yiddish language. Yiddish words like knish are routinely pronounced with both the hard "K" and "N" sounds, in much the same way as "conniption."

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Discuss this Article

anon962777
Post 14

Great definition and explanation! I had just attempted to describe what I thought it meant, from when I had heard my mother, and her mother, use it years ago, - which resulted in me Bing!ng it - and we actually used several of the same phrases! You must be a genius! Seriously, well done!

seag47
Post 13

My coworker had a conniption fit last week. The boss had just demoted her, and she started throwing around everything she could lift while yelling. She held nothing back, and she wound up getting fired instead.

shell4life
Post 12

@healthy4life – Yes, I believe it was. Often, if a person is angry enough to let circumstances get the best of her in public, she will lose all control and just start screaming things that don't make sense.

I had a friend who caught her boyfriend with another woman in a restaurant. She was so angry that she threw water on both of them and started growling and shouting her words at the same time. It was a very scary experience for everyone involved, and though they may not have been able to interpret her words, there was no mistaking her intentions.

healthy4life
Post 11

I've seen couples fighting in public before, and there have been times when women screamed their words so loudly that I couldn't tell what they were saying. Was this a conniption fit?

StarJo
Post 10

My mother used to say that I was having a temper tantrum when I pitched a fit as a young child. However, once I became a teenager, she started calling them conniption fits instead.

I've always associated temper tantrums with children and conniption fits with adults. To me, conniption fits occur when a person has had all they can take. Children don't let frustration build up over time and then release it when one more thing happens.

anon303715
Post 9

I am a Catholic and have never seen any such "fits" taking place in Catholic rituals, as described by anon58044. Perhaps those in the so-called Catholic Charismatic movement might exhibit such phenomena, but they are a rather controversial spiritual movement practiced by some Catholics, and their activities take place in prayer meetings and such outside official liturgical contexts (aside from rare cases of abuse). They therefore have nothing to do with the Church's official liturgy or ritual.

Although I personally avoid the charismatic stuff like the plague and have therefore never witnessed such things first hand, my understanding is that it's very much like the things that go on at Pentecostal meetings, and in fact is rooted in Protestant Pentecostalism.

In any case, since the "Catholic Charismatic" movement originated in the late 60s - early 70s, the hypothesis that the word "conniption" may originate in Ecclesial Latin is unlikely at best.

anon296934
Post 8

@anon58044: Are these like the sort of things you may see in Pentecostal services?

anon154518
Post 7

I am impressed by the exceptional description of what a "conniption fit" is and the descriptors used to assist in describing a human emotion; an oft-times difficult-to-do procedure.

anon77743
Post 5

A conniption is an aneurysm or (non-sexual) stroke. Also, it can be a seizure. There are more severe varieties of conniption fits.

anon75183
Post 4

Great description! I just had one a while ago when my children destroyed my living room!

anon58044
Post 3

Great explanation here. However I have also seen the word "conniption" used to describe the fits which strike some individuals during elaborately emotional rituals held in the Catholic Church -- could it thus have a (vulgate) Latin origin after all?

anon51513
Post 2

I don't know. Oxford English's Dictionary is the source for conniption fit definitions in the UK.

anon13240
Post 1

Wow. This is dead on. The most perfect definition of a conniption fit I have ever seen. Webster has nothin on you guys.

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