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What is Atelophobia?

A pole vaulter with atelophobia may be so worried about failing that she misses her goal.
Insomnia may accompany atelophobia.
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  • Written By: Malcolm Tatum
  • Edited By: Bronwyn Harris
  • Last Modified Date: 19 August 2014
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Atelophobia is a condition in which an individual exhibits an extreme fear of failing to achieve perfection in any of their actions, ideas, or beliefs. This highly sensitized and fearful aversion to any type of imperfection can cause people to become highly critical of anything they say or do, always fearing that their offerings are flawed and not good enough. The fear of imperfection goes far beyond wanting to do things as competently as possible; in cases where there is a true phobia, the condition becomes an obsession that effectively ruins relationships and makes it almost impossible to function in society.

As with a number of phobias, people who develop atelophobia are often highly intelligent and possess many talents and capabilities. Unlike many people who measure their competency in relation to others with similar talents, the true atelophobic sets a standard for perfection that is impossible to reach. Because of this impossible personal standard, an individual suffering with this condition will constantly be attempting to refine, rework or improve something that is already highly regarded by those around them.

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Symptoms of this phobia include a high degree of irrational irritability aimed at the self and sometimes manifested toward others. The atelophobic is often so scared of failing to measure up that he or she becomes immobilized by the fear and is unable to complete projects or will not turn them in for fear they are not good enough. A high degree of excitability is common, as well as insomnia and an inability to relax for even a couple of moments. The patient is constantly on edge and feels pressure to continue working until perfection is reached.

Owing to the complexity of the factors that go into the condition, a psychologist or therapist is needed to truly identify and define atelophobia. The therapist can help the patient come to terms with this irrational fear of failing to achieve perfection and find ways to reverse the tendency. As part of the course of treatment, the therapist may recommend the use of anti-anxiety medication in order to assist the patient to relax for brief periods. Ongoing therapy is helpful in restoring a balance to life that does not eliminate the positive aspects of competition or stifle the creativity of the individual. Instead, the frustration of failing to be perfect is replaced with a sense of accomplishment for a job well done that is worthy of admiration by everyone, including the individual who envisioned and completed the task.

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Discuss this Article

anon341655
Post 20

This is the problem nowadays. There is a name for every kind of problem a person faces on a daily basis or at least at one time or another. So what do we do? We prescribe drugs for it. No wonder insurance costs are astronomical.

anon341371
Post 19

There are some good resources online. I believe I'm an atelophobic because of the characteristics listed. And yes, atelophobia can cause depression.

anon293261
Post 18

I know I am a perfectionist, but I don't think I'm bad enough to say I have atelophobia. I hate that I'm this way because people say I'm hard to please or just be around. I'm working on this problem.

However, I do want to say I believe a person can have atelophobia and be overweight. Also, I think people need to recognize the difference between atelophobia and anorexia or bulimia. --Chels

anon263558
Post 17

Yes, it actually can lead to depression but you should go check with a doctor first before assuming anything.

anon219080
Post 16

I think I may have this. All my life all I've had was grades and school, I was never popular and (guess what) I have almost always been overweight.

Lately I've been working out and dieting to lose weight, so now I'm scared as hell when I know I'm being graded or judged on a performance, so I freeze up because I don't want to fail or be judged harshly. I also tend to have intense spouts of depression when I look back on past muck ups or ones that have happened recently. Is this considered atelophobia? To reply just say @Eli

anon172801
Post 15

to: anon153955: You can be fat. Seriously. You really can. Some people are fat/bigger because of their depression. (If you don't know what I'm talking about,ask a doctor about it).

anon153956
Post 14

Being atelophobic is not the same thing as being a perfectionist.

anon153955
Post 13

Atelophobia is found mostly in people who suffer anorexia/bulimia, but it could also apply to people who work out like crazy to attain that perfect body. Here's the kicker. You will never see a fat atelophobic. people with atelophobia would never let that happen to themselves, especially with such a problem with imperfection.

anon145292
Post 12

I know I am alteophobic when it comes to beauty. I also have sleeping problems, but I don't think I have it simply for one thing.

anon144741
Post 11

I believe my daughter also has this, having read the classic symptoms and has also developed an eating disorder. It's difficult to find help getting a diagnosis when some GPs know very little about the condition. I worry constantly about her health and state of mind. She has an appointment with a counselor next week. I hope she finds the strength to discuss her problems.

anon142523
Post 10

i believe i have it. i don't know. it's hard to actually come out and say it. I am anorexic, I'm about 94 pounds, 5'3" and I'm 19. lately I've been in a really bad depression. and a huge procrastinator.

anon41496
Post 9

i was diagnosed with atelophobia 4 months ago, but the funny thing is i'm a male anorexic with borderline personality disorder. i'm always telling myself "push a little more. you know you've got to be perfect." sad day when a healthy boy grows up to be 5 foot 9 and weights 98 pounds. atelophobia is no joke.

anon40784
Post 8

what is difference between a perfectionist and an atelophobic?

anon39839
Post 7

I also have it. I usually can stay up for days until I absolutely need sleep. I have also developed anorexia.

anon39060
Post 6

i have this and recently i have developed a slight case of anorexia. i can go a full two days on only three hours of sleep. when i have a big project for school, i procrastinate until about two days before it's due, then stay up all night working on it so i get full credit.

anon38870
Post 5

I beilieve that this is the disorder I have. Everything in this article describes the complete and utter pressure and anxiety I feel when it comes to writing a paper in school or doing an art project.

I also have isomnia, and I often stay home from school because I have a paper to hand in that I'm not done tweaking, and it's just not good enough.

I don't want to be seeing a therapist though. Are there any effective self-help ways?

anon37521
Post 4

Well, I am studying about Alteophobia because I am interested in it and in order to write my cause and effect essay. Therefore, is there any studying about the effects of it?

anon37461
Post 3

Wouldn't everyone have a slight case of this at sometime or another? I am like that about some things anyway

anon37269
Post 2

I have it, and I am being put on anti-depressants. But I don't know, it could be different for other people. I also developed anorexia.

anon36681
Post 1

does this kind of phobia ultimately lead to depression?

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