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What is Morganite?

Morganite has pink tones ranging from light to a deep rose.
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  • Written By: Sheri Cyprus
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  • Last Modified Date: 26 September 2014
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Morganite is a rare, pink semi-precious gemstone of the beryl family of minerals. Beryl is the mineral beryllium aluminum cyclosilicate, and its hexagonal crystals are transparent, except when another mineral is present that adds color. In the case of morganite, which is also called pink or rose beryl, it's manganese that gives it it's pinkish hue. The larger gemstones are more prized since their transparent pink color tends to be more pleasantly intense than the colors of smaller stones. Many large stones are a cool light pink to medium rose that is paired with white gold in jewelry designs, while those that are a warm salmon pink better suit yellow gold jewelry settings.

While this stone is suitable for use in many different types of jewelry, it shouldn't be used for rings worn daily because these are likely to become scratched or chipped. Harder gems, like diamonds, are better for rings. The diamond rates a perfect 10 for hardness on the Mohs scale, which is used to evaluate the hardness of gemstones to determine their durability for use in jewelry. Morganite only measures a 7.5. This gemstone can be used in a necklace or earrings because such jewelry usually receive less wear and tear.

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A morganite stone should never be marketed as a pink emerald because it isn't one and it's illegal to represent it as such. Emeralds are in the same beryl family, as are aquamarines and heliodors, but they are different stones. Aquamarines have an icy green-blue color, while heliodors are more of a rich green-yellow. Morganites are usually sold at a reasonable price, but they are rare and not easy to find on the market.

These stones are found naturally in countries such as Afghanistan, Brazil, Madagascar, Namibia and Russia. Some American states are good sources as well, including California and North Carolina. Due to its rarity, this gem tends to be collected more than it's sold.

The gem was known as pink beryl until 1911, when it was named for the gemstone collector and banker John Pierpont Morgan, by the gemologist George Frederick Kunz. At the time, Morgan was the biggest customer of Tiffany's, the New York jewelry company. Cool pinkish morganite stones are still often sold as pink or rose beryl, while warmer stones may be marketed as peach or champagne beryl.

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anon955162
Post 8

I have found morganite, but I don't know its value. Can someone give me advice?

MedicineBall
Post 5

@Jacques6 - No, morganite is *not* diamond. It is a separate gem entirely. It was confused with diamonds when celebrities started ordering pink diamonds.

Pink diamonds are darker than morganite -- which is always a pale soft pink. If you end up buying pink diamonds -- beware! If they are the treated (and much cheaper) kind, make sure you get the kind with a good coat. Some of them have coatings that wear off.

Morganite will always be whatever color it is, since it's natural. I say, go with the morganite earrings.

Jacques6
Post 4

Dumb question but is morganite actually diamond or something different entirely?

I see a ton of jewelry that is labeled as "morganite diamond" jewelry and I'm trying to figure out if it's just a combination of the two or if morganite is a type of diamond. The jewelry is cheaper than most of the stuff just labeled diamonds, so it must be something else. But I would like to be sure.

I wanted to buy morganite earrings and a morganite bracelet for my wife for our upcoming anniversary. I'm just not sure if I should get diamonds or what. Any help would be wonderful.

zeak4hands
Post 3

@Calvin77 - I know what you mean about morganite jewelry. It's very beautiful.

I actually have a morganite gemstone that I keep in my fish aquarium. It's a really small piece that I got out of an old morganite ring. The ring got bent to heck and back, but the gem was okay so I kept it.

Loose morganite is just a pretty before they cut it -- especially the white morganite. It kind of looks like a diamond. White morganite really picks up the colors around it. I saw it in a gold ring and it seemed to pick up the shininess of the gold without the warm tone.

Calvin77
Post 2

There is a TV series called "Earth 2" that used morganite. There is a greedy character named Morgan and he finds a rare gem deposit on the planet they are on. He stakes his claim and names it "Morganite."

Morganite is beautiful. It is the perfect shade of pink -- kind of a baby pink. Most other gems are too dark or bright for my taste.

I have a pink morganite ring that is silver with a heart-shaped gem. I've always wanted to find a morganite pendant to match it, but they are either expensive or not for sale.

anon163798
Post 1

I was looking for some information on morganite carbon, which I assume is a trade name for a particular type of carbon composite.

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