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What Is Moss?

Moss growing on stones in a stream.
Moss.
Moss on stones around a waterfall.
Moss growing between cobblestones.
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  • Written By: S. Scolari
  • Edited By: L. S. Wynn
  • Last Modified Date: 17 August 2014
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Moss is a very simple type of plant that lacks conventional roots, stems, and leaves. The name refers to any species of the class Bryopsida and is part of the division Bryophyta. Bryophyta means the first green land plants to develop during the evolutionary process. It is thought to have evolved from very primitive vascular plants, and it has not given rise to any other plant life.

Lacking traditional vascular structures of true leaves, stems, and roots, moss growth is limited to moist locations. It is usually very hardy and grows almost everywhere, except under the sea. The plant usually grows vertically. Except for species in the commercially viable Sphagnum genus, it is generally of little use to humans or animals, although it is sometimes eaten in times of famine.

Moss is sometimes used to fill in barren habitats such as in dried lakes. It is also used to provide a backdrop for other plants in gardens, or simply to add color where grass refuses to grow.

Unrelated plants can share the name. These includes club moss; flowering moss; carageen, which is a type of algae sometimes used in health foods; reindeer moss, which is actually a lichen; and Spanish moss. Spanish moss is usually regarded as a parasite, since it often grows on other plants, such as oak trees. It grows in long streamers and is often seen in the Southern states of the US.

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The Japanese have gardened with moss for centuries. Valued for its reduced need for watering, its greenness is considered to add a feeling of lushness and serenity to Japanese gardens.

This plant is often used in rock gardens or with water gardens, ferns, or ponds because it needs so little maintenance. With concerns about drought growing in different parts of America, it has become an increasingly desirable alternative to high-maintenance grass lawns and conventional gardens using shade plants.

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Crimea
Post 13

I love moss! It is like a green fuzzy carpet that is natural and incredible to the touch.

There are a variety of ways to promote moss growth, but mixing it with buttermilk and spreading over a damp area with a paintbrush seems to work best.

Perdido
Post 12

I like to grow rose moss. It grows low to the ground and has fern-like projections for leaves. The flowers are multicolored and resemble roses.

I don't think it has actual flower stems. The same stem-like structure that runs across the whole plant is what both the leaves and flowers grow off of, and the entire plant can be yanked out of the ground way too easily.

Unlike most moss that requires lots of moisture, rose moss can survive drought-like conditions. It does better when watered once a week or more, but if water is unavailable, it can still live for quite some time.

seag47
Post 11

I saw a lot of beautiful Spanish moss in 2007 when I vacationed at Tybee Island, Georgia. I had to drive through Savannah to get there, and all the old oaks that lined the streets were draped in moss.

This moss looks so elegant, as if it were put there on purpose as a decoration. It is a greenish-gray color, and it hangs down like a lacy curtain cut into sections. When the wind blows, it looks truly haunting.

I have seen Spanish moss on trees in several Southern states close to the Gulf coast. Mississippi and Alabama both have it in their southernmost areas.

cloudel
Post 10

@orangey03 – I love it when moss pops up by surprise! There is some growing in a shady area of the pasture beside my house, and I love to go lie down on it.

This moss isn't like the close-cropped kind that grows in most lawns. It is thicker, and it reminds me of a fluffy, plush carpet. The pieces of greenery are longer, so it is super soft.

I tried to transplant some of it to my yard, but I guess my soil isn't moist enough, because it died. It sure would have been nice to have had some growing close to the house.

orangey03
Post 9

I have some lawn moss, and I absolutely love it. I didn't even have to plant it. It just appeared one day, after my little shade trees had grown enough to provide adequate shade to my yard.

The area where the moss grows is shaded all the time. This helps conserve the moisture in the soil and create ideal growing conditions for the moss.

It always feels cool on my bare feet. It is so soft and soothing, especially if I've been walking in sandals in the heat and I take them off to walk on the moss.

anon134380
Post 8

how does moss get in your trees?

anon124440
Post 6

can you die from moss?

anon24893
Post 5

can you put what is the difference if moss had vascular tissue in it?

anon22910
Post 4

your article is very helpful, but it would be great if it was a little longer, and had some information about moss reproduction!

thedelands
Post 3

how is moss used in other cultures?

anon17748
Post 2

Does moss grow mostly on the north side of a tree?

anon5877
Post 1

How is Moss of use to the Chinese and West Indian cultures?

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