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What Is Nasal Papilloma?

An ear, nose and throat specialist can evaluate and treat a nasal papilloma.
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  • Written By: Mary McMahon
  • Edited By: O. Wallace
  • Last Modified Date: 04 August 2014
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A nasal papilloma is a benign growth located inside the nose. Papillomas can often be diagnosed by a general practitioner during a general physical examination which includes a look into the nose, and the physician may refer a patient to an ear, nose, and throat (ENT) specialist for further evaluation and treatment. There are several treatment options available for nasal papillomas, depending on the cause and location of the growths, and an ENT specialist can discuss the options with the patient.

These growths are basically warts in the nose, and are often caused by viruses which lead to the development of warts, such as the human papilloma virus. The growth is hard, with a wrinkled and rough appearance, unlike a polyp, which is smooth. It can be located anywhere in the nose, and some people experience the development of multiple growths in their noses.

Classically, a nasal papilloma blocks the nose, impeding breathing or sense of smell. People may also experience discomfort as the growth develops, and the growths can bleed. A rare type of growth known as an inverted or inverting nasal papilloma has growth which extends into the underlying tissues of the nose. Around one in ten of these unusual growths can turn cancerous, which makes them a cause for concern when they are identified on a physical exam.

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When someone is diagnosed with a nasal papilloma, one treatment approach is simply to leave it in place with no interference or treatment. The growth is usually benign and is hidden inside the nose, so it should not be an aesthetic issue. If the patient starts to experience difficulty breathing or finds that the sense of smell is occluded, however, recommendations to remove the growth may be made. Several removal techniques can be used, usually in the comfort of a doctor's office, with minor aftercare required to prevent infection in the nose.

If a patient has a nasal inverted papilloma, a doctor may recommend laboratory testing of the growth. A pathologist can examine the cells to see if they are benign or cancerous. If cancerous cells are detected, some more aggressive treatments may be needed. Usually a medical imaging study is also recommended to look more thoroughly inside the nose and head for any other signs of abnormal growth which could be indicative of a problem. These cancers often respond well to early intervention.

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hessie28
Post 5

I just had one removed and it was the easiest recovery I've ever had. I was put under general anesthesia. The doctor said it was massive. He had taken it out in his office in October 2013 but could not get it all. It grew back by January 2014 and filled the entire sinus cavity. I'm hoping it doesn't come back, but I'm never that lucky.

Don't be afraid of surgery, though. I had a doctor who doesn't pack the nose, which is a plus.

anon345902
Post 4

Colloidal silver has worked on these for me, and it works on warts too.

I get it online and there are also other brands which are more potent. Soak a tissue with the colloidal silver, and let it sit on the area for a while.

bear78
Post 3
@turkay1-- That's true. Especially HPV caused papillomas always come back because the virus is still in the blood.

I've had inverted nasal papilloma removed three times. The last time, they even removed part of my skin and nasal bone because it was very deeply embedded. Hopefully it won't come back. The doctor said that they got all of it this last time, including the root.

I think an inverted nasal papilloma is the worst. The root can go down deep under the skin. And many times, doctors don't try to get the root out during the first surgery. So it always comes back and this time it's even harder to remove than the last time.

@turquoise-- You didn't mention if your papilloma is an inverted one, but if it is, have it removed as soon as possible. And make sure they remove the whole thing, it's the best decision in the long run.

candyquilt
Post 2

@turquoise-- I would strongly advise against that!

The first reason why you shouldn't seek home remedies to remove a nasal papilloma is because it's not actually a wart. It looks like one, but it's not, it's a tumor. People commonly refer to it as a wart, but that's incorrect. And don't forget that if it's a squamous papilloma, it's caused by an infection. So it's not a good idea to play around with it. Instead of making it better, you will cause more damage. You have to let the doctors take care of it.

The only way to remove a nasal papilloma is to have it surgically cut out. But you don't need to be scared. It's easy, you might not even need general anesthesia. Sometimes they remove it under local anesthesia. The only worrisome part about this treatment is that it may have to be repeated. Unfortunately, nasal papillomas tend to come back. So there is no guarantee that this will be the only surgical treatment you have for it.

turquoise
Post 1

Can traditional wart treatments be used for nasal warts? Or does it have to be surgically cut out?

I've had warts on my hand before and I know that there are several different treatment options available for that. I had mine laser burned, but they also freeze them now.

Now I have a wart inside my nose. It's not very large, I haven't had breathing problems so far. But my doctor has been observing it and since it has been growing pretty rapidly, he wants to remove it as soon as possible before I have problems. He said that they will cut it out.

I'm scared about this and wondering if it could be removed in another way? Since it's the same as warts on other parts of the body, can regular wart treatments be used?

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